Develop This!

Running dry on ideas? Only see “repetition” and the tone in one character’s lines? Really can’t find anything to say?

To develop your analysis of one point, you can think about the progression of a character / persona’s tone or effects — how the tone intensifies or shifts — while close-analysing the “key points” or “turning points” in the progression.

This close analysis means you have to: (i) explore the quotations in finer detail, looking out for nuances / minute differences (e.g. the reference to “Dad”); and (ii) explore the effects in finer detail, looking at how “desperation” is “not-so-desperate” early on, or how a patient appeal can escalate towards a firm demand.

Here are a couple of figures that might help, especially if you’re in the graph-plotting crowd. Evidently, I am too. 😉 Examples below are taken from the Proof (2000) extract in Paper 3 CA4.

Developing Your Analysis

An Introduction to Drama

Rip You to Pieces

Hello students! We’ll be studying a grand total of THREE plays this year, so you should expect to be swimming in a lot of character dialogue, stage directions and ‘visualisation’ of stage action, stage movement and characters’ expression.

We will be using much of our tutorial time in the first few weeks of Term 2 to expose you to these aspects and how to read / analyse a dramatic text of course.

I thought you might find the following lecture I did in 2015 useful and maybe enjoyable (I know I did, but that’s me). You will also see for the umpteenth time my obsession with the Hamlet reference on the SCGS banner within the notes, so I apologise in advance. It did have a role in me teaching you, so maybe it’s not all that bad? Maybe? (P.S. I just used a mix of rhetorical questions).

That’s So Drama (Notes)

That’s So Drama (Slides)